Browsing articles in "AllnOne Knitting Loom"
Oct 27, 2014

Loom FAQs – How Do I Read a Pattern?

Loom-FAQs1

Another question that is often asked is “how do I read a pattern?”  Most times, it’s not even a question.  People will flat out say they don’t know how to read a pattern.  Or that patterns are too hard to read.  Some will even say they don’t care to learn when there are videos to watch.  Well I will say this:  If you don’t learn at least the basics of reading patterns, then you are limiting yourself to what you can make since not all patterns have videos.  So today I would like to address some of those Frequently Asked Questions in regards to reading a pattern.

Where do I start when I am reading a pattern?

I always recommend to start by reading the pattern fully first.  See what you need and when you need it.  Most times if it’s a pattern that has new skills, it can be overwhelming to read through it first.  That is ok.  Do not panic.  It happens to the best of us.  Then you take a deep breath and proceed gathering your supplies.  Once that is done, then you start.  But before we get into starting, let’s discuss how a pattern is usually written.

Patterns can usually be broken down into 3 parts.  I will be using parts of my Paving Rainbows hat pattern for an example.  You can find the complete pattern here:  http://knittingboardchat.com/blog/index.php/archives/1363

 

Part 1:

The first part is the list of items you need to complete the project.  This is where you will find which loom is required, yarn recommended, and other notions needed.  Patterns will list the yarn needed in number of skeins, yards, or weight.  If you are using a different yarn than the one specified and it’s listed by skeins, balls, or yardage, then you will just need to compare the yardage of the yarn you are wanting to use with the one that was used in the pattern to make sure you have enough since not all skeins or balls have the same amount of yarn in them.

The Paving Rainbow Stones Hat pattern

     Loom: All-n-One loom set for 72 pegs. Sample made on the All-n-One.

     Yarn: 1 skein Bernat Mosaic in Calypso – Color A (or any medium weight yarn color of your choice). 1 skein Red Heart Super Saver in Black – Color B (or any medium weight yarn color of your choice)

     Notions: Loom tool, Tapestry needle for weaving in ends

Part 2:

The second part is the abbreviations, gauge, and pattern notes.  In stand-alone patterns available on blogs or other sites, this will follow the list of items.  If it is a pattern in a book, the abbreviations will most likely be found at the front or back of the book.  But the gauge and pattern notes, if any, will still be in this location.

What is gauge?

Gauge tells you how many stitches and rows are in a certain number of inches so you know if your tension is correct when knitting an item that needs to be a certain size.  So if it reads,

In stockinette, 20 stitches x 30 rows = 4 inches

you will take a ruler and measure your swatch or work.  If you count 20 stitches in 4 inches on a row in all knit stitches and 30 rows in 4 inches, then you have achieved gauge.

Some patterns will not have it listed if gauge is not important.  Or sometimes the designer forgot to list it.  Oops…

What are pattern notes?

Pattern notes are the special instructions or little helpful tidbits provided by the designer to help clarify how the pattern is to be worked.

      Pattern Notes

· Use only one strand of yarn.

· Carry yarn to the inside of loom when not using. Do not cut.

      Abbreviations

· K – flat or u-wrap knit

· P – purl

· S – slip (skip)

· Rnd(s) – Round(s)

Part 3:

The third part is the actual instructions.  Most times it will be written out by rows or rounds.  Some patterns may be written in steps, like I did with my corkscrew tutorial.

     INSTRUCTIONS

E-wrap cast on all pegs.

Rnds 1 – 18 – With color A, K all

Place cast on loops back on pegs, knit over

Rnd 19 – K all

Drop Color A to inside of loom. Add Color B.

Rnd 20 – With color B, K all

Rnds 21-23 – P all

Drop Color B to inside of loom. Pick up Color A.

Rnds 24-29 – With color A, K3, *S2, K6*, repeat from * to * until last 5 pegs, S2, K3

So let’s start at the beginning.  First you will cast on.

What cast on and bind off methods do I use if the pattern doesn’t specify?

In this pattern, I specify an e-wrap cast on.  But when a particular cast on or bind off isn’t specified, then you just use the one that you like best.

Then you start with the first row or round.  In this pattern, rounds 1 – 18 are all the same, so instead of writing out each round, I combined them all into one line.  So for those 18 rounds, you will knit all the pegs.

Now let’s skip to after the brim is made.  I made a note to drop the first color and add the second.  It looks a little out of place here, but there are times where the instructions are needed in the pattern as you go along which is why the instructions for the color change is between the rounds.  Sometimes the designer will write those at the end of the row or round so there is not a break like you see here.

What does it mean when it says to “repeat from *”?

Let’s now look at rounds 24 – 29.  In this pattern, I put an * at the beginning and end of the part that is to be repeated.  Sometimes it will just be at the beginning of the repeat and then say “repeat from * to the end of the row”.  But what does that line mean?  We have seen rounds that are all knits or all purls.  But now we have a mixture of stitches with repeats.

The round reads “With Color A, K3, *S2, K6* repeat from * to * until the last 5 pegs, S2, K3”.  If that were written out for all the pegs, it would read like this:

With color A, knit 3 pegs, slip 2 pegs, knit 6 pegs, slip 2 pegs, knit 6 pegs, slip 2 pegs, knit 6 pegs, etc., until only 5 pegs remain in the round.  Then slip 2 pegs and knit 3 pegs.  Then you start the next round.  Or if it was written peg by peg, it would be: knit, knit, knit, slip, slip, knit, knit, knit, knit, knit, knit, slip, slip, knit, knit, knit, knit, knit…

So you can see why the rows or rounds are condensed down into abbreviations and repeats.  Otherwise, a simple pattern would be the size of a small book.

The more complicated repeats will often involve parenthesis as well as asterisks.

So to start off when learning to read a pattern, you may want to write each row or round out so you can better understand it.

And to keep from being overwhelmed by the entire pattern, I would recommend you concentrate on one row at a time.  Just go stitch by stitch and then row by row.  If something doesn’t seem to make sense then look at the previous row and the following row.  Sometimes it will make more sense when you see what is just below or just above the row you are working.

What do the abbreviations mean?

Reading patterns is like reading code.  The reason for abbreviations is for saving space, especially in books and magazines.  Here are some of the more common abbreviations.

 

BO – bind off

CA – color A

CB – color B

CC – contrasting color

CO – cast on

Dec – decrease

EW – e-wrap

Inc – increase

K – knit

K2tog – knit 2 together

KO – Knit over

M1 – make 1 increase

MC – main color

P – purl

P2tog – purl 2 together

PSSO – pass slipped stitch over

Rep – repeat

Rnd (s) – rounds(s)

S or sl – slip

SSK – slip, slip, knit those 2 stitches together

W&T – wrap and turn

YO – yarn over

What knit stitch do I use if it doesn’t say?

Most times if the pattern just says knit then it is a true or traditional knit stitch.  Some people like to call it a reverse purl.  You can use the u-wrap, flat knit, or even e-wrap, if you are needing to achieve a certain gauge due to your tension.  If the pattern says “no e-wrap”, then it is not recommended to use it since it really is a different stitch entirely.  It is taller and looser and will alter the finished size.

Why are patterns not all written the same?

This is a great question.  I really don’t have a good answer to that one except to say that, while most designers try to keep uniformity to patterns so that they are easy to read, some people are beginners, want to share their designs, and just don’t know how patterns are most commonly written.  And sometimes designers will write a pattern how they like to read them.

Why can I not just use videos?

There usually are not videos for all patterns.  And people cannot randomly make videos without the designer’s permission since it violates copyright.  But when working a pattern and you come across a technique you are unfamiliar with and the written instructions for that technique are confusing, videos are very helpful, and I would recommend using them.

How do I write a pattern?

If you are writing a pattern for the first time and are unsure of what to do, look at other patterns on blogs or on Ravelry.  Then try to follow suit in whatever way makes sense to you.  Most times, our first efforts seem to fall short of our expectations.  Just take a deep breath and try your best.  We all start somewhere and learn.

I really hope this helps get you started on reading patterns.  The worst thing that could happen is that you will need to rip the project out and start over.  But it is only yarn after all.  It is designed to be taken apart and reknit.

 

2 Comments

  • Excellent post, Renita! :) I would only add to your first bit about reading the pattern through entirely first and then possibly feeling overwhelmed or confused…a lot of times the steps that are confusing at the front end make way more sense when you are actually at that section and ready to knit it. I say this as an encouragement not to give up when that original confusion hits upon the first read-through. Just dive in and have fun! :D

    Once again…fantastic advice!

  • Thank you, Bethany! That means a lot to me. While I did say that later, I realize I should have addressed it at the beginning for those who don’t read the entire article.

    Just taking it stitch by stitch and row by row often answers those confusing questions we might have after the first read through.

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Oct 17, 2014

Hashtag Hat

Have some fun and hashtag you!  Great project for beginners using 2 stitch variations. It is sized for youth with an option for an adult.

hashtaghatLoom:  All-n-One Loom, set up for double knit

Yarn:  Patons Shetland Chunky, 25% Wool and 75% Acrylic, 148 yds per skein

Colors used:  #78209 Soft Teal (1 skein) and #78042 Charcoal (1/2 skein)

Stitches:  Stockinette and Rib

Notions Needed:  Knit Hook, crochet hook, measure tape, scissors, darning needle

Finished Size:  Youth=20” and Adult=23-24” head circumference, aprox 9” high from brim to pompom

Gauge:  5 stitches and 10 rows= (2) inches in stockinette

Special Note:  Using the full width of this loom makes a youth/small size hat.  To knit a larger hat as in our sample, we have added a small back panel to increase the width.  Using a larger loom ie the 28” loom will result in larger gauge and larger stitches which will change the shape slightly of the ‘hashtag’.

Instructions:hashtag.angle

Hat Front with ‘hashtag’:

Cast On all pegs or 48 stitches in Rib Stitch using Teal Yarn.  Lay anchor yarn of contrast color yarn.

Work (2) rows in Rib stitch.

Tie on color 2 Charcoal at 2nd peg.  Do not cut the Teal yarn.

Work (1) row in Rib stitch with Charcoal yarn.  Cut and knot.

Work (1) additional row in Rib with Teal yarn.

Change to stockinette and work (2) rows.

Hints:  Mark the center of the loom with a stitch marker or pin.  Next row will be row 1 of the bottom of ‘hashtag’.  Whenever you are working the Charcoal for just the 2 stitches of each upright, weave the 2 consecutive pegs front to back and move over to 2nd upright and weave the 2 consecutive pegs front to back.  Then, weave the Teal yarn in Stockinette weave skipping the upright pegs.  When, you are working the long rows of charcoal, weave the stitches in stockinette, and then weave the Teal yarn in Stockinette weave skipping the charcoal stitches.  Notice in your graph that the uprights will shift over by (1) stitch to give the design an angled look.

Go to center of loom, count back (4) stitches and tie on the Charcoal yarn.  Work the (4) upright stitches.  Note that there will be 3 pegs skipped in center of them.  Lay the charcoal yarn down where you end.  It doesn’t matter which direction you do the front to back for the 2 uprights.  Weave the row with the Teal yarn and hook over.  The ‘hashtag’ design consists of a total of (15) rows.  Once complete, you can cut and knot the Charcoal yarn.  Hat will be completed in Teal Yarn.

Work (7) additional rows in Stockinette.

Change to Rib stitch.  Work total of (14) Rib rows to top of hat.

Work Decrease row on row #6 and row #10.

Decrease Row explained:  decreasing some stitches at top part of the hat will add some shape to the head and keep the top of the hat from being too ‘bunchy’ or bulky.  So, we will do a decrease to 2 stitches on each side of the design.  That will take out a total of 4 stitches on each decrease row and make the top of hat fit much better.  Before doing the weaving and hook- over, go to stitch #8 from left side.  Lift the stitch and place it on peg #9.  Go to stitch #12 from left side.  Lift the stitch and place it on peg #13.  Now you have 2 empty pegs.  Go to right side of loom and count over to peg #8 and place this stitch on adjacent peg to left.  Count over to peg #12 and place this stitch on adjacent peg to left.  Do this to both sides of the board directly across from each other.  You now have (4) empty pegs on each board.  Carefully, lift the stitches and move towards the center of loom.  You want the empties to be at ends of loom.   Now, weave and hook over the row carefully lifting all loops on each peg so that only the one loop remains on the pegs.  Continue working in Rib stitch.

Repeat this decrease process on row #10.  Complete the hat with Rib stitch.

Removing the hat from loom:  Since we are at the top of the hat, we want to create another anchor yarn to gather the top of hat.  Do not bind off.  Instead, cut and knot the working yarn.  Cut another piece of the working yarn about 24” long and thread onto the darning needle.  Pick up the stitches working from one board to the other and allow the stitches to come off the loom onto the yarn.

Small – youth size finishing:  Sew the back seam using invisible stitch with matching yarn, Teal.  Bind off the brim edge stitches.  Gather the top of hat by pulling the yarn securely and tying a secure knot.  Hat is ready for a fun pompom.

Large adult.  In order to add more width to back of hat, we knit a matching piece that will be seamed into the side edges of the hat front.

Cast On 10 stitches in Rib stitch. (More if you want a larger than large hat)  Our 10 sts will add 4” to the size of the hat.  Work this small piece just as you did the hat front only no design is needed and no decreases are needed.  Do work the matching stripe on row 3 to match the front of hat.

Once complete and free of the loom, seam to the hat front using invisible stitch on both sides connecting the 2 pieces into one round hat.  If you use the invisible stitch for the seaming, the seams will not show.  Just be sure to match the Charcoal stripe exactly.  Now, gather each section with the anchor yarns at top of hat.  Tie the yarn securely.

Now you can bind off in one continuous yarn at brim.  Either size, you are ready for the pompom.  We have used both yarns for the pompom in the sample, but you can choose to make it all one color, if desired.  Wrap the yarns around a box or anything that will give you approximately 5” long strands.  Wrap 20-30 wraps; tie in center very securely.   Cut the loops and shake the pompom loose.  Use the yarn tie of the pompom to secure to top of hat.  To finish the hat, use the crochet hook to tuck in any yarn tails that remain from the seaming and knotting.  Shape the pompom as short or as shaggy as desired.  In our sample, we trimmed it up a bit, but left it fairly long.

For a complete look, make a matching Hashtag Scarf. Very cute!

 

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Oct 13, 2014

Whimsical Loom Knits – October 2014

Happy October!  In my little corner of the world, the air has grown chilly, darkness comes earlier, and there are Halloween decorations popping up everywhere.  I thought it would be fun to make a few little ‘spooks’ for this month’s Whimsical Loom Knit project.  I hope you have tons of fun with this pattern.  

Mini Monsters!

IMG_2754 (585x800)

 If you go out on Halloween night,

You’d better not go alone!

It’s creepy out there on Halloween night,

But spookier still at home!

For every little monster that ever was

Will prank and haunt you tonight, because

This is the night to knit up a scary delight!

 

 

Materials

Knitting Loom:  KB Sock Loom 2

Yarn:  Approximately 15-20 yards of a basic worsted weight yarn.  Red Heart Super Saver was used in the samples.

Notions:  Knitting tool, scissors, yarn needle, fiberfill for stuffing

Suggested Embellishments: 

Eyes:  Tiny buttons (6mm), google eyes, fabric paint, yarn, thread, etc.

Mouth:  Yarn, thread, fabric paint, etc.

Hair:  Yarn, felt, etc.

Finished Size:  Approximately 5” in height

Gauge:  Not essential for this project.

Special Techniques

Drawstring Cast-On:  Step 1: Pass the working yarn in front of peg 1.  Pass the working yarn behind peg 2.  Pass the working yarn in front of peg 3.  Pass the working yarn behind peg 4.  Continue weaving the working yarn in front of and behind the pegs until the working yarn reaches peg 1 again.

Step 2:  Lay the working yarn against peg 1, above the wrap from step 1.  Knit the lower wrap over the top wrap.  Pass the working yarn in front of peg 2.  Lay the working yarn against peg 3, above the wrap from step 1.  Knit the lower wrap over the top wrap.  Pass the working yarn in front of peg 4.  Continue working in this manner until the working yarn reaches peg 1 again.  Cast on is now complete.  Continue on as directed in the pattern.

Adding a Gathering Thread:  Cut a 12” length of yarn and thread it on to the yarn needle.  Push the yarn needle up under the stitch on peg 1.  Pull the length of yarn out through the stitch, stopping when an inch or two remains at the bottom of the stitch. Move to the next peg and pull the yarn needle up under the stitch.  Pull the length of yarn until all of the slack is gone between the two pegs.  Continue working in this manner until the gathering line has been pulled up under the last stitch in the round. Remove the yarn needle.  Leave the gathering line in place.  It will be used later to shape the monster’s neck.  Continue on as directed in the pattern.

3 Stitch I-Cord:  Using the double E-wrap cast-on method, cast on 3 stitches.  *Working yarn will be at peg 3.  Take the working yarn behind peg 2 and peg 1.  Bring the working yarn around the front of peg 1 and lay it across pegs 1, 2, and 3.  Knit peg 2, then peg 1, then peg 3.  Repeat from * as directed in pattern, or until I-cord reaches the desired length.  Gently pull on the cord every few inches to help set the stitches.

Bind the I-cord off by moving the stitch on the second peg over to the first peg, placing it above the stitch on the peg.  Knit the bottom stich over the top stitch.  Move the stitch from peg 3 over to peg 1, placing it above the stitch on the peg.  Knit the bottom stitch over the top stitch. With the working yarn, wrap peg 1 and knit it.  Cut the working yarn, leaving a yarn tail measuring about 4”.  Draw the working yarn out through the last stitch remaining on peg 1, and gently pull on the yarn tail to secure the bind off.  Weave in all yarn ends.

Instructions

Head and Body:

Prepare the loom to work over 18 pegs, in the round.  Choose a yarn color for the head.  Using the drawstring cast-on method, cast on 18 stitches.  Work 10 rows using the u-wrap knit stitch.

Add a gathering thread.  (See special techniques)

If desired, switch to a new color for the body.   Work 15 more rows using the u-wrap knit stitch.  Remove from the loom using the gathered bind off method, but do not gather yet.  Set aside.

 Limbs (Make 4, or more):

Using the same color that the body was worked in, cast on 3 pegs.  Work a 3 stitch I-cord for 6 rows.  Switch to chosen head color, if desired.  Work 3 stitch I-cord for 4 more rows.  Bind off and set aside.  Repeat this process for the remaining limbs.

Finishing:

Work with the head and body piece first.  Gather the top of the head closed by pulling on the yarn tail from the drawstring cast-on.  Use the yarn needle to weave the tail in.

Stuff the head section with fiberfill.  Gather the neck area by pulling on the yarn tails of the gathering thread.  Secure the neck shaping by tying a knot in the gathering thread.  Use the yarn needle to weave in the ends of the gathering thread.

Stuff the body section with fiberfill.  Gather the body closed by pulling on the yarn tail from the gathered bind off.  Use the yarn needle to weave the tail in.

Use the yarn needle to sew the limbs to the body.  Attach the arms near the neckline; attach the legs at the bottom of the body.  Weave in any remaining yarn tails.

Now for the best part – embellishing!  Give your monster(s) hair.  Or horns.  Eye(s).  Mouth.  Fangs.  Scars.  Whatever your imagination can scare up.  Only, maybe avoid giving them a laboratory brain marked A B Normal…

Tip:  Each monster is knit as directed in the pattern.  Different looks can be achieved by varying the colors and types of fibers used while knitting, as well as using a variety of embellishments.  Let your creativity run wild!

IMG_2759 (600x800)

Frankenstein is embellished with button eyes. Mouth and scar are embroidered on. Hair is added a strand at a time. It is tied into the top of the head, the plies are split, then the hair is mussed up a bit.

IMG_2757

Voodoo doll is embellished with one button eye and a button heart. Mouth and second ‘eye’ are embroidered on. He is also brushed with dark eye shadow to give him a dirty appearance.

IMG_2758 (600x800)

Monster is knit in a strand of basic worsted weight acrylic, along with a thin, fuzzy novelty fiber to give him a furry look. He is embellished with one googly eye, backed by a slightly larger felt circle.

            

4 Comments

  • I think these are the sweetest spooks ever! You’ve really come up with some darling gouls for us to loom knit, Jenny! Spooktacular job!!! :D

  • Love!!!

  • Thank you, Bethany and Dale!

  • give me an idea for a different helloween , they will be suprised !

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Sep 27, 2014

Ameline Shawl

Amelina600

We close the month of Shawl-September with Ameline, a simple lace pattern that spreads throughout the shawl to resemble cascading drops. We hope you have enjoyed the shawls during our first Shawl-September.

Knitting loom: All-n-One Knitting Loom

Yarn: 620-900 yards of light worsted weight merino wool. Malabrigo Rastita in Dewberry was used in sample.

Notions: knitting tool, row counter (optional), tapestry needle, eight stitch/peg markers.

Gauge: 16 sts x 18 rows= 2 inches in stitch pattern, blocked.

Size: 16 inches x 36 inches

Abbreviations

K: knit stitch

P: purl stitch

Sl1: slip 1-skip one peg with yarn behind the peg.

Rep: repeat

K2tog: knit two stitches together. Over two pegs, working on the knitting loom from a right to left direction—peg 1 is on the right, peg 2 is on the left.  Move stitch from peg 1 to peg 2. Leave peg 1 empty. Treat both loops on peg 2 as one loop.

YO: yarn over (ewrap peg)—special note: on the following row after creating the YO, undo the ewrap on the peg and simply lay the yarn in front of the peg.

Sl1-k1-psso: slip 1, knit 1, pass slipped stitch over. Over two pegs, working on the knitting loom from a right to left direction—peg 1 is on the right, peg 2 is on the left. Skip peg 1 with yarn behind the peg, knit peg 2. Move loop from peg 2 over to peg 1, lift bottommost loop off peg 1.

Zig Zag Stitch Pattern
Multiple of 6+1

Row 1, 3, 5 (from right to left direction): *sl1-k1-psso, k2, yo, k2; rep from * to last st, k1.

Row 2, 4, 6: k to the end of row.

Row 7, 9, 11: k3, *YO, k2, k2tog, k2; rep from * to last 4 sts, YO, k2, k2tog.

Row 8, 10, 12: k to the end of row.

Pattern note: the shawl pictured is 40 inches in length and used 600 yards of yarn, if you desire a longer shawl, you will need approximately 800 yards of yarn. A special note about yarn—we recommend using a wool base yarn to allow the lace to be blocked..

INSTRUCTIONSAmelina Shawl Close Up

Cast on 93 sts, prepare to work a flat panel.

Border rows

Row 1: k to the end of row.

Row 2: p to the end of row.

Rep last two rows four more times.

End of border rows, continue to body rows below

Tip: Place a stitch marker on pegs 1-4 and on peg 90-93. Maintain the garter stitch border on the first 4 pegs and last 4 pegs, the pegs with the stitch/peg markers on them.

Row 1: k4, on next 85 sts follow the Zig Zag Stitch pattern Row 1, k4.

Row 2: p4, on next 85 sts follow the Zig Zag Stitch pattern Row 2, p4.

Row 3: k4, on next 85 sts follow the Zig Zag Stitch pattern Row 3, k4.

Row 4: p4, on next 85 sts follow the Zig Zag Stitch pattern Row 4, p4.

Row 5: k4, on next 85 sts follow the Zig Zag Stitch pattern Row 5, k4.

Row 6: p4, on next 85 sts follow the Zig Zag Stitch pattern Row 6, p4.

Row 7: k4, on next 85 sts follow the Zig Zag Stitch pattern Row 7, k4.

Row 8: p4, on next 85 sts follow the Zig Zag Stitch pattern Row 8, p4.

Row 9: k4, on next 85 sts follow the Zig Zag Stitch pattern Row 9, k4.

Row 10: p4, on next 85 sts follow the Zig Zag Stitch pattern Row 10, p4.

Row 11: k4, on next 85 sts follow the Zig Zag Stitch pattern Row 11, k4.

Row 12: p4, on next 85 sts follow the Zig Zag Stitch pattern Row 12, p4.

Rep last 12 rows until item measures approx 34 inches from cast on edge (or desired length of shawl).

Next 10 rows: repeat the 10 border rows.

Bind off with basic bind off method. Weave ends in. Steam block or wet block to desired measurements—blocking the item will allow the eyelets formed by the yarn overs to open up more. Tip: When blocking, use blocking wires to have straight edges.

 

8 Comments

  • can i ask a question about the ameline shawl pattern regarding the pattern rows 1, and 7 and will i receive a response. please let me know and then i will do so. thanks, debra

  • If the answer is within our knowledge, yes, if not, we will direct you where you could find the answer.

  • onr row 1 : slip peg 1, knit peg 2, move loop 2 on peg 1, k over, move loop on peg 3 to peg 2, move loop on peg 4 to 3, k2, yo k2 and repeat. is my interpretation correct?
    do u use regular knit stitch and not ewrap or ustitch.
    on row 3 i’m totally confused if i move loops to left to get empty peg and then have 2 loops on pegs. do i have to start at the end and adjust loops? can u please explain. thanks very much, debra

  • i think i’ve got it. row 3: move loop from peg 6 to 7, 5 to 6 and 4 to 5. yo peg 4 knit peg 5 and 6 and knit peg 7 which has two loops, k2 and then repeat. is this correct? thanks, debra

  • Debra,
    Row 1, 3 and 5: Work the 4 garter stitch edge stitches, then commence the Zig Zag stitch pattern as follows:
    Step 1: Skip peg 1 with yarn behind the peg.
    Step 2: knit peg 2.
    Step 3: move loop from peg 2 over to peg 1.
    Step 4: Lift bottommost loop off peg 1.
    Step 5: Move loops as follows: from 3 to 2, from 4 to 3. 4 is empty.
    Step 6: knit peg 2 and 3.
    Step 7: YO on peg 4.
    Step 8: knit peg 5 and 6.

    Let me know if the above helps, it is over 6 pegs. The last rep of the shawl, will have the 6 stitches, plus one more stitch.

  • Thank you so much! I love your patterns and have bought quite a few over the years!

  • thanks isela for the detail description. another quick question. do you suggest regular knit stitch or can i use ewrap or uknit. thanks, debra

  • True knit stitch.

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Sep 23, 2014

Yarn Yammer: A Few of my Favorite Yarns

 

When I was asked to do a yarn review column I was excited! After all I have loved yarn since even before I was a knitter! When I was little I love to get my hands on the stuff and just play. I made little yarn dolls, sewed with it, glued it on stuff and just about anything I could imagine up! So now here is my chance to play with some yarn again, and tell you all about it.

I thought I would start out with a few of my favorite ‘go to’ yarns. These are the ones I love to use and I know will work well on looms and needles.

encore colorspun

Plymouth Encore is one of my first choices when I do a project. Encore comes in a variety of yarn weights from DK up to super bulky and since it is a 75% acrylic, and wool blend it is machine washable and dryable while still being able to be blocked nicely to define your stitch patterns.

The worsted weights come in 128 solid colors and 64 ‘colorspun’ options which is a color changing yarn that coordinates very well with the solids. Plymouth Encore also comes in a center pull ball so there is not winding necessary!

The only downside to this yarn is that it is only available through local yarn shops or online, not at larger stores like Joann Fabrics or Michaels.

 

 

My other go to worsted weight yarn is Patons Classic wool. This is an 100% wool yarn which means you will need to hand wash it, but also means it will block beautifully! Being a wool yarn, it will also have some more give to it, so it is really ideal for stitch patterns that require you to manipulate the yarn a bit like lace and cables, the more stretch a yarn has, the less likely you are to break, or pull out a peg when you are looming. It is not the softest yarn, but it is soft enough for next to the skin wear, and will keep you cozy and warm.

 

lornashepherd

For socks I have two favorites! The first is Lorna’s Laces Shepherd Sock yarn. I have to admit, that I have a bit of a loyalty to Lorna’s Laces due to the yarn’s namesake being the one who launched me on my book writing career. That said the yarn is wonderful! It is soft, 100% super-wash merino; which means it’s machine washable and durable. This yarn comes in a variety of solids and multi-colors that are all beautiful. I have gotten more complements on the colors of my knits when using this yarn, than any other. There are two downsides to this yarn first it is available through local yarn shops and online. Second, it comes in skeins, so you will need to wind it up into a ball or yarn cake before you start knitting!

My second choice for go to sock yarn is Patons Kroy Sock yarn. This yarn is a 75% woo 25% acrylic blend. I have found it to be very durable, and the colors are lovely too! I have made socks for my little boys with this yarn, and they grew out of them before the socks wore out!

Kroy Sock is available at Joann fabrics, and comes in a center pull ball, so not winding here! It is machine washable and dryable as well, so all in all there are no downsides to it!

 

 malabrigolace

For lace hands down the race goes to team Uruguay! (These yarns make me want to visit my brother who lives there all the more!)  Manos Del Uruguay and Malabrigo are my picks!

Manos del Uruguay lace is a 70% Baby Alpaca, 25% Silk, 5% Cashmere blend, giving it softness, warmth and strength that has no match!

Malabrigo lace is 100% Baby Merino wool, which is soft and strong and makes the hand dyed colors pop out in bold vibrant shades.

Both of these yarns come in skeins, so you will need to wind them up. They are a bit pricey, but worth EVERY penny! They also only usually can be found in local yarn shops and online.

Both have a range of beautiful hand dyed colors. They are both companies that help local artisans, look for ways to be ecologically responsible in their manufacturing processes, and love independent designers. All pluses in my book!

Well, those are some of my top pick go to yarns, I hope you get to play with some of them yourself. Leave me a comment, and let me know what your go to yarns are, I would love to know!

I also look forward to playing with some more yarns and letting you know all about them! Until next time, keep knitting, and remember.. if you mess up, it’s only yarn, you can unravel it and try again!

 

3 Comments

  • Mmmm…yummy yarns! :D I love them all, but have to say that Plymouth Encore is also one of my own favorite go-to yarns…perfect for just about anything worsted or chunky and has really great “bounce”.

    Looking forward to hearing about more yarns from you, Denise! :)

  • My most favorite go to yarn is from Knit Picks. I love their 100% wool and wool blends. They work great on the loom and hand knitting. Red Heart is always in my stash for a quick go to for scarves, hats and other projects. Others I enjoy working with are Bernat, Caron, Lion Brand, Deborah Norville. I have used so many brands, it is hard to pick just one, but top pick has to go to yarns from the Knit Pick Co. They are my favorite go to place.

    Sue Kreitzer

  • Nice feature, Denise! I fear my fiber wishlist will grow exponentially with each article you write…

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Sep 8, 2014

Whimsical Loom Knits – September 2014

Hello! My name is Jenny Stark.  I am so excited to be joining you here at Knitting Board Chat!  Once a month, I will be sharing a whimsical little project that you can make with your KB looms.  These projects will be fast and fun – perfect for squeezing in to your busy schedule.  After all, you know what they say about all work and no play…  So, let’s chase those doldrums away with a little bit of yarn!

Layered Loopy Flower

This darling little flower is a great way to use up little bits of yarn left over from other projects.  Make a handful of flowers and use them to embellish hats, bags, hair clips, cards, etc.

IMG_2661 (1024x768)

Loom:  Kb Hat Loom, set up for small gauge.  (This project only requires 2 pegs- one of the 9 peg rails was used for the samples.)

Yarn:  Approximately 5 yards of a #4 yarn.  Each layer of this flower uses about 2.5 yards of yarn.  Work it all in one color, or use two different colors for variety.  Samples use various yarns, including Mosaic by Bernat, Boutique Unforgettable by Red Heart, and Sheep(ish) by Caron.

Notions:  Knitting tool, scissors, yarn needle, button, needle and thread.

Gauge:  Not important for this project.

Size:  About 2″ in diameter.

Instructions

Flower (make 2)

Cast on 2 pegs.

Knit peg 2, twelve times.

Move the stitch on peg 2 over to peg 1.  Knit the bottom stitch over.  (1st petal loop now created)

*Cast a new stitch on to peg 2.

Knit peg 2, twelve times.

Move the stitch on peg 2 over to peg 1.  Knit the bottom stitch over.  (next petal loop now created)

Repeat from * until there are six petals total.

Bind off:  Cut yarn, leaving a 5″ yarn tail.  Knit the last stitch and pull the yarn tail out through the last stitch.  Gently pull on the yarn tail to tighten the bind off.

Forming the flower:  Your knitted piece will be a bit of a jumble when you first take it off of the loom:

IMG_2665 (800x600)

Turn it over, and straighten it out.

IMG_2666 (800x600)

Now it is time for a little needle magic.  Thread the yarn tail from the bind off side through the eye of your yarn needle.  Pass the needle through the bottom of the first petal (where the cast on tail is):

IMG_2667 (800x600)

then pass the needle down through the two loops at the bottom of the next petal:

IMG_2669 (726x800)

Continue to stitch down through the two loops at the bottom of each petal, gently gathering the center of the flower as you work.  When you are finished forming the flower, pass the needle through the center of the flower to the back side.  Your finished flower will look like this:

IMG_2670 (800x600)

Set the first flower aside and make the second flower.

Finishing: Stack one flower on top of the other.  Use the yarn tails to sew the top flower to the bottom flower.  Weave in all ends.

Using the needle and thread, sew a button to the center of the flower. (If preferred, the button can be applied with hot glue.)  

Now – go and make a handful of flowers!  Happy embellishing!

IMG_2672 (800x600)

5 Comments

  • That makes a very sweet flower. Thanks for sharing your creativity.

  • I love it! Such a cute embellishment for any kind of project…or just as a pin or a hair band! I’m so glad we’ll be hearing regularly from such a talented loomer! :)

  • oh i love it….thanks for sharing :)

    Love the last line ‘Now – go and make a handful of flowers!’ :D

  • Anything with the word Whimsical hooks me in… As always Jenny – Lovin it :)
    denise

  • Thanks to each of you for your kind comments. Have a great day!

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