Browsing articles in "About STITCHES"
Nov 3, 2014

Stitchology III

 Chain Lace Stitch worked as a Flat Panel

CLS Square

In this monthly column we’re going to be working on some exciting new stitch patterns, as well as a few new techniques thrown in for good measure.  My intention for our yarn play is to provide all the know-how for you to be able to work the new stitch; any charts, photos, or videos you may need; as well as a pattern to create an 8” x 8” square.  As we go along in our looming journey, we should be able to create lovely pieced afghans with our squares, as I like to know that we’re going somewhere while swatching, don’t you?  You can think of it as our Stitch Sample Afghan—a stitch dictionary right at your fingertips, keeping your legs warm, lol. ;)

This month we’re going to get your fingers flying with a stitch that lends itself perfectly for holiday gifts!  You may have already heard of the Chain Lace Stitch, which I developed way back in the spring of 2012 as an introductory cowl pattern for the KB All-n-One Loom.  Since that time, I’ve received several requests to demonstrate how to work the stitch as a flat panel, rather than in the round.  I thought this month would be the perfect time to do this, as the Chain Lace Stitch would make a simply gorgeous scarf for holiday gift giving!  The pattern below is for our customary 8” x 8” square, but you can easily modify the pattern for creating pieces of a larger size.  Let the holiday looming commence! :D

 

Chain Lace Stitch worked as a Flat Panel

CLS close up

Items Needed:

Loom: Authentic Knitting Board Adjustable Hat Loom: 2 rounded pieces + 3 peg connectors, with pegs in all holes for a 3/8” gauge.  The Sock Loom 2 or the All-n-One Loom could also be used.

Yarn: approx. 55 yards Worsted Weight (Sample uses Patons Classic Wool Worsted in Jade Heather)

Notions: Loom tool, yarn needle, scissors.  (Also helpful: peg markers, row counter)

Pattern Notes:

This stitch has also been worked in the round to great effect!  You can find two of these projects in the All-n-One Pattern Book: the Daytimer Bag and the Market Hat (as a way to weave the belt around the brim). To work this pattern in the round for a cowl, bag, or hat, see the video here.

For flat pieces of a longer size, begin with the Set Up Rows (working more as necessary for a wider border), then simply increase the number of Main Pattern Rows for the length desired. You will also want to match the final rows to the number of Set Up Rows.

This pattern is worked with CLS sections worked over 4 peg repeats, with border sections of 4 pegs on either side. For creating a flat piece of a wider size, increase the CLS section by increments of 4, and the border sections as desired.

When the pattern uses the term “knit” or “k”, please use the true knit stitch or the u-stitch, not the e-wrap.

You may notice that the number of vertical border rows are greater than the number of stitches required to make the chains.  This is intentional.  The bordering garter stitch has a smaller gauge than the e-wrapped chain. The differing number of rows and chain stitches make for an even height in both.

Pattern Abbreviations:

Abbreviation Key

Grab your easy chair and a cuppa’ your favorite brew and we’ll go over, step-by-step, how to create the Chain Lace Stitch as a Flat Panel in this brand new Tutorial Video: (*See below for pattern’s complete written instructions)

Repeating Pattern Rows

There are two separate pattern rows which will be repeated throughout the Main Pattern Rows of the stitch. They are as follows:

CLS close up lgCLS Row One (peg #’s are for CLS section, not for peg #’s in actual pattern row)

* Peg 1:  move loop to peg 2, EW around peg 5 times (DO NOT KO!)

Peg 2:  EW once, KO 2 loops over 1. Move the top EW from peg 1 to peg 2 and KO. Repeat process to KO all 5 EW’s from peg 1.  Peg 1 will now be empty.

Peg 3:  move loop to peg 4

Peg 4:  EW and KO 2 loops over 1.  EW and KO 5 more times to create a chain.

Repeat from * until the end of the CLS section, or until pattern states.

CLS Row Two (peg #’s are for CLS section, not for peg #’s in actual pattern row)

* Peg 1: move loop to peg 2

Peg 2: EW and KO 2 loops over 1.  EW and KO 5 more times to create a chain.

Peg 3: move loop to peg 4, EW around peg 5 times (DO NOT KO!)

Peg 4: EW once, KO 2 loops over 1. Move the top EW from peg 3 to peg 4 and KO. Repeat process to KO all 5 EW’s from peg 3.  Peg 3 will now be empty.

Repeat from * until the end of the CLS section, or until pattern states.

Step by Step Instructions:

Cast onto your loom from right to left, using a total of 28 pegs. (Sample uses Chain Cast On)

Set Up Rows

Repeat the following 2 row pattern 3 times, for a total of 6 rows:

Row a: k28

Row b: p28

Main Pattern Rows

CLS front angle

Repeat the following 16 row pattern 2 times, for a total of 38 rows for your square (Some of these rows will require several steps to complete one row.):

Row 1:

  • -Pegs 1-4: You will be creating a flat panel using only these 4 pegs for 9 rows. Repeat the following 2 row pattern, ending with Row a, and at peg 4:

Row a: k4

Row b: p4,

  • -Work CLS Row One of Repeating Pattern Rows to peg 24,
  • -Move peg 24’s loop to peg 23,
  • -EW peg 24 5 times,
  • -Knit pegs 25-28,
  • -* Purl pegs 28-25,
  • -Add top wrap from peg 24 to peg 25, and KO 2 loops over 1,
  • -Knit pegs 26-28,
  • -Repeat from * of Row 1 three times, for a total of 9 rows on pegs 25-28.

Row 2:

  • -Purl pegs 28-22,
  • -* Lift connecting line to the front of peg 21 and purl,
  • -Purl peg 20,
  • -HHCO peg 19,
  • -Purl peg 18,
  • -Repeat from * of Row 2 to peg 5,
  • -Purl pegs 4-1.

Row 3:  k28

Row 4:  p28

Row 5:

  • -Pegs 1-4: You will be creating a flat panel using only these 4 pegs for 9 rows. Repeat the following 2 row pattern, ending with Row a, and at peg 4:

Row a: k4

Row b: p4,

  • -Move loop from peg 4 to peg 3,
  • -EW peg 4 5 times.
  • -EW peg 5 and KO,
  • -Move the top EW from peg 4 to peg 5 and KO. Repeat process to KO all 5 EW’s from peg 4.  Peg 4 will now be empty,
  • -Move top loop from peg 3 back to peg 4,
  • -CLS Row Two of Repeating Pattern Rows to peg 23,
  • -Move the loop from peg 24 to peg 25
  • -EW  peg 24 5 times,
  • -KO 2 loops over 1 on peg 25,
  • -Knit pegs 26-28,
  • -*Purl pegs 28-25,
  • -Add top wrap from peg 24 to peg 25, and KO 2 loops over 1,
  • -Knit pegs 26-28,
  • -Repeat from * of Row 5 three times, for a total of 9 rows on pegs 25-28.

CLS angleRow 6:

  • -Purl pegs 28-23,
  • -* HHCO to peg 22,
  • -Purl peg 21,
  • -* Lift connecting line to the front of peg 20 and purl,
  • -Purl peg 19,
  • -Repeat from * of Row 2 to peg 5,
  • -Purl pegs 4-1.

Rows 7-10:  Repeat Rows 3 & 4, then 1 & 2 of Main Pattern Rows.

Rows 11-16: Repeat the following 2 row pattern:

Row a: k28

Row b: p28

Repeat the previous 16 row pattern once more to complete the square.

Bind off all stitches loosely. (Sample uses the Basic Bind Off)  Weave in ends and trim close to work.

Block to an 8” x 8” measurement.

Afghan Notes:

If you are intending this square to be part of an afghan, you may wish to make up to 3 or 4 additional squares.  We will be sharing at least 12 of these patterns for you to use in your blanket.  Use the following general measurements to decide how many of each of the 8″ x 8″ squares you will need, rounding up as necessary:

  • Baby Blanket: 30″ x 36″
  • Children: 42″ x 48″
  • Lapghan: 36″ x 48″
  • Twin Bed Afghan: 60″ x 85″
  • Queen Bed Afghan: 90″ x 95″

1 Comment

  • Beautiful work, Bethany!

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Oct 7, 2014

Stitchology II

Puff Stitch

Happy Autumn!  This is my absolute favorite time of year.  I simply can’t get enough of it!  Puff Stitch SquareI am thrilled by simple things like hay mazes, big orange pumpkins in a field, chilly mornings, and candy corn.  It’s a season that is full of reasons to celebrate…of course it makes it all the better that my birthday is also in October, lol. ;)

In this monthly column we’re going to be working on some exciting new stitch patterns, as well as a few new techniques thrown in for good measure.  My intention for our yarn play is to provide all the know-how for you to be able to work the new stitch; any charts, photos, or videos you may need; as well as a pattern to create an 8” x 8” square.  As we go along in our looming journey, we should be able to create lovely pieced afghans with our squares, as I like to know that we’re going somewhere while swatching, don’t you?  You can think of it as our Stitch Sample Afghan—a stitch dictionary right at your fingertips, keeping your legs warm, lol. ;)

This month we’re going to celebrate the Fall Season by introducing the Puff Stitch, which greatly resembles pumpkins in a field, all connected by trailing vines.  Of course, this stitch will be terrific during all other times of the year, as well. It employs a really marvelous way to create elongated knit stitches on our looms, which result in all those lovely little puffs.

 

Puff Stitch Square

Puff Stitch

Items Needed

Loom: Authentic Knitting Board Adjustable Hat Loom: 2 rounded pieces + 3 peg connectors, with pegs in all holes for a 3/8” gauge.  The Sock Loom 2 or the All-n-One Loom could also be used.

Yarn: approx. 75 yards Worsted Weight (Sample uses Lion Wool in Pumpkin)

Notions: Loom tool, yarn needle, scissors.  (Also helpful: peg markers, row counter)

Pattern Notes:

This stitch pattern would apply itself very nicely to a cozy hat, or a baby blanket.  To work this pattern in the round for a hat, use the Repeating Pattern Rows chart, and make sure to read it from right to left for each row, rather than alternating sides each time.  Also, cast onto your loom in a clockwise direction, using a number of pegs that is divisible by 10—the number of stitches required for each pattern repeat.

For flat pieces of a greater size, begin with the Set Up Rows, then simply increase the number of Repeating Pattern Rows for the length and width required, then complete with the Finishing Rows.

When the pattern uses the term “knit” or “k”, please use the true knit stitch or the u-stitch, not the e-wrap.

The elongated knit stitch, notated in the pattern as k², is created using the following method (the row numbers are as you would find the steps in the Puff Stitch Square pattern further below):

*to see a photo enlarged, just click to open, then click to open again.


Knitting Chart Key k2

Here is the entire pattern chart for the 8” x 8” square:

Pumpkin Patch (Puff) Square Chart

Everything you need to know about knitting your square is included in the above chart.  Believe it or not, you can actually create your square without looking at another thing!  For help with reading charts, please see the Stitchology I post for a detailed explanation, and you’ll be ready to go!

But, don’t worry…I am also providing you with the step by step instructions below. ;)

Repeating Pattern Rows

Pumpkin Patch (Puff) Stitch Chart

Row 1:  p6, k²3, p1

Rows 2:  k²5, p5

Row 3:  p5, k²5

Row 4:  k²5, p5

Rows 5:  p5, k²5

Row 6:  k²5, p5

Rows 7 & 8:  p6, k²3, p1

Row 9:  k²5, p5

Row 10:  p5, k²5

Row 11:  k²5, p5

Row 12:  p5, k²5

Row 13:  k²5, p5

Row 14:  p6, k²3, p1

Step by Step Instructions:

Cast onto your loom from left to right, using a total of 32 pegs. (Sample uses Chain Cast On)

Set Up Rows

Repeat the following 2 row pattern 3 times, for a total of 6 rows:

Row a: k32

Row b: p32

Main Pattern Rows

Repeat the following 14 row pattern 3 times, for a total of 42 rows:

Puff Stitch Square 3D Row 1:  p1, work Row 1 of repeating pattern to last stitch, p1.

Row 2:  p1, work Row 2 of repeating pattern to last stitch, p1.

Row 3:  p1, work Row 3 of repeating pattern to last stitch, p1.

Row 4:  p1, work Row 4 of repeating pattern to last stitch, p1.

Row 5:  p1, work Row 5 of repeating pattern to last stitch, p1.

Row 6:  p1, work Row 6 of repeating pattern to last stitch, p1.

Rows 7 & 8:  p1, work Row 7 of repeating pattern to last stitch, p1.

Row 9:  p1, work Row 9 of repeating pattern to last stitch, p1.

Row 10:  p1, work Row 10 of repeating pattern to last stitch, p1.

Row 11:  p1, work Row 11 of repeating pattern to last stitch, p1.

Row 12:  p1, work Row 12 of repeating pattern to last stitch, p1.

Row 13:  p1, work Row 13 of repeating pattern to last stitch, p1.

Row 14:  p1, work Row 14 of repeating pattern to last stitch, p1.

Finishing Rows

Repeat the following 2 row pattern 3 times, for a total of 6 rows:

Row a: p32

Row b: k32

Puff Stitch Square-angleBind off all stitches loosely. (Sample uses the Basic Bind Off)  Weave in ends and trim close to work.

Block to an 8” x 8” measurement.  If you’d like to give your puffs more of a 3D affect, you can carefully place small balls of plastic wrap under each little puff during the pinning process of the blocking. I found that Glad Cling Wrap worked really well for this as it has a bit of stick to it, which helped the balls stay in place.

Afghan Notes:

If you are intending this square to be part of an afghan, you may wish to make up to 3 or 4 additional squares.  We will be sharing at least 12 of these patterns for you to use in your blanket.  Use the following general measurements to decide how many of each of the 8″ x 8″ squares you will need, rounding up as necessary:

  • Baby Blanket: 30″ x 36″
  • Children: 42″ x 48″
  • Lapghan: 36″ x 48″
  • Twin Bed Afghan: 60″ x 85″
  • Queen Bed Afghan: 90″ x 95″

 

15 Comments

  • i sure hope you will do a video on this.puff stitch square. Personally, I learn better by watching it actually being done.. It’s so pretty

  • Hi Jen :) I’m not sure if there will be a video in the next few days, but possibly in the next few weeks. ;) I really think that this stitch is so easy that you could definitely get it by following each of the tutorial photos step by step. Build your loom knitting skills by just diving in and giving it a try…I bet you’ll be surprised at how quick and easy it is to accomplish! :D

  • I was wondering how you do row 14 on the top of the puff stitch.

  • Hi Jean :)

    You just work it as the chart states, working normal purls in the spots at the previous elongated knits, and start over again with new elongated knits in the places where the new puffs begin. You’ll be purling with the the three elongated stitches as you would usually purl…there will just be a little extra yarn there to purl with. ;)

  • Your puff square is fabulous, Bethany! Great work!

  • Thank you for the great instructions and the pictures were most helpful. It is an easy stitch. I have senior moments so I got extra practice lol. It reminds me of polka dots and I could see this as a scarf with 60′s retro pink, orange, and white. Thanks again.

  • Oh, that would be really cute, Cindy! The first swatch I made on this was created with a different yarn of a more reddish color and all of my family *separately* said this stitch looked like “Meatballs in Sauce!” Lol. I like pumpkins, puffs, and polka dots much better. ;)

  • I would love to see a video on this especially for the elongated knit. Thanks

  • Thank you for teaching these stitches which I am always looking for something new and different to put together. I am making a hat on the new hat loom unfortunately I am not using all the pegs. I am using the 42 pegs, double strand yard. Can I incorporate this stitch on top of my brim?

  • Hi Bethany – I will definitely share this on my page, just the pictures of course with links back here to the pattern.
    Beautiful. You, my Loomy sister are blessed !
    denise

  • […] is the second stitch in a series the Knittingboardchat.com blog calls Stitchlogy. I love the look you get with this technique. I can’t help but think of […]

  • Hi Teresa! :) I don’t see why you couldn’t incorporate this stitch on your hat…I would love to see photos of how it turns out!

    Thank you so much, Denise! :) Glad you are enjoying the new stitches.

  • can I ask if you are wrapping your knit stitches or if they are flat knitted?

  • This is not ewrapped.

  • Is there going to be a video on this I have been waiting for one Bethany indicating there might be one in the next few weeks Is there going to be one
    Thanks

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Sep 1, 2014

Stitchology I

Herringbone Stitch & Working with Charts

Herringbone Square angleHi!  My name is Bethany Dailey and I’m new here at Knitting Board Chat. I am so happy to loom along with you!  In this monthly column we’re going to be working on some exciting new stitch patterns, as well as a few new techniques thrown in for good measure.  My intention for our yarn play is to provide all the know-how for you to be able to work the new stitch; any charts, photos, or videos you may need; as well as a pattern to create an 8” x 8” square.  As we go along in our looming journey, we should be able to create lovely pieced afghans with our squares, as I like to know that we’re going somewhere while swatching, don’t you?  You can think of it as our Stitch Sample Afghan—a stitch dictionary right at your fingertips, keeping your legs warm, lol. ;)

The Ins and Outs of Chart Reading

First up is the Herringbone Stitch.  This is a nice and easy stitch involving repeating rows of knits and purls.  The slightly tricky part of this stitch will be to keep proper count while working the pattern.  To help us along in this process we can use a couple of aids…the first of which is a knitting chart.

Here is the basic stitch chart for this particular pattern:

Herringbone Stitch-chart

When reading a knitting chart, you will be starting at the bottom right and working your way up the chart, from row to row.

Notice how the numbers across the bottom are listed from right to left?  This is because you will be casting onto your looms first from left to right, then your first row will be worked from right to left, matching up each peg number with each of the numbers on the chart bottom.

The numbers which are running up the sides of the chart represent your row count.  As you can see, row number 1 will be worked from right to left, as that is where that row number is designated on the chart.  Row number 2 will be worked from left to right, as that is where you will find the number 2 listed.

By alternating the sides that the row numbers are listed, you are given the clue that this pattern is meant to be worked as a flat panel. If this was a chart that was meant to be worked in the round, you would see each of the row numbers all listed on the same side, because in the process of knitting in the round, you would always be starting each row from that same spot as you worked around the loom.

Knitting Chart Key with grey copy

Now that you know which direction to read the chart, it’s time to decipher what the chart is actually saying.  For this, we need to take a look at the Chart Key.  Here is where the symbols you see in the chart are listed in knitting terms, along with their abbreviations.  For each symbol on the chart, a corresponding stitch will be worked in that exact spot of your row.

The herringbone stitch is a simple one, containing only 2 stitches: knit and purl.  Where you spot a blank square on the chart, you will knit.  Where you spot a dot, you will purl.  It’s as simple as that! :)

Oh, I did mention a couple of aids, right?

The second aid that I love to use while knitting pretty much every project is a good set of stitch markers— or peg Notionsmarkers, as we who love to loom knit tend call them.  These can be pretty much anything that will fit over your pegs, but won’t get in the way of the creation of your stitches.  I love to use them to mark the first and last pegs used in a pattern, as well as any other helpful places that remind me of what I’m supposed to be knitting.   In the case of the herringbone stitch, a good place for them is at the start of every pattern repeat during the row.

Another essential-to-me aid for keeping my place in a pattern I’m working is a good reliable row counter.  This can be a store bought one, a cell phone app, or even something as simple as marking little chicken scratches on a piece of paper at the end of every row.  However you want to do it, a row counter helps avoid lots of frustration in the long run.

Herringbone Stitch Square

Herringbone Stitch

Items Needed

Loom: Authentic Knitting Board Adjustable Hat Loom: 2 rounded pieces + 3 peg connectors, with pegs in all holes for a 3/8” gauge.  The Sock Loom 2 or the All-n-One Loom could also be used.

Yarn: approx. 105 yards Worsted Weight (Sample uses Patons Classic Wool Worsted in Jade Heather)

Notions: Loom tool, yarn needle, scissors, measuring tape.  (Also helpful: peg markers, row counter)

Pattern Notes:

With the beginning of the school year and those chilly Autumn days, this would be a terrific pattern to use as a cozy scarf for both guys and gals!  Simply increase the number of Main Pattern Rows for the length required, then complete with the Finishing Rows.

When the pattern uses the term “knit” or “k”, please use the true knit stitch or the u-stitch, not the e-wrap.

 

Here is the entire pattern chart for the 8” x 8” square:

Herringbone Square-chart

Everything you need to know about knitting your square is included in the above chart.  Believe it or not, you can actually create your square without looking at another thing!

But, don’t worry…I am also providing you with the step by step instructions below. ;)

Repeating Pattern Rows

Herringbone Stitch-chart

Row 1:  k3, p2, k1, p2, k2

Row 2:  k1, p2, k3, p2, k2

Row 3:  k1, p2, k5, p2

Row 4:  p1, k2, p1, k1, p1, k2, p1, k1

Step by Step Instructions:

Cast onto your loom from left to right, using a total of 37 pegs. (Sample uses Chain Cast On)

Set Up Rows

Repeat the following 2 row pattern 3 times, for a total of 6 rows:

Row a: k37

Row b: p37

Main Pattern Rows

Repeat the following 4 row pattern 15 times, for a total of 60 rows:

Row 1:  k3, work Row 1 of repeating pattern to last 4 stitches, k4.

Row 2:  p3, k1, work Row 2 of repeating pattern to last 3 stitches, p3.

Row 3:  k3, work Row 3 of repeating pattern to last 4 stitches, k4.

Row 4:  p3, k1, work Row 4 of repeating pattern to last 3 stitches, p3.

Finishing Rows

Herringbone SquareRow a:  k3, work Row 1 of  repeating pattern to last 4 stitches, k4.

Row b:  p37

Row c:  k37

Row d:  p37

Row e: k37

Row f:  p37

Bind off all stitches loosely. (Sample uses the Basic Bind Off)  Weave in ends and trim close to work.

Block lightly to 8” x 8” measurement.

Afghan Notes:

If you are intending this square to be part of an afghan, you may wish to make up to 3 or 4 additional squares.  We will be sharing at least 12 of these patterns for you to use in your blanket.  Use the following general measurements to decide how many of each of the 8″ x 8″ squares you will need, rounding up as necessary:

  • Baby Blanket: 30″ x 36″
  • Children: 42″ x 48″
  • Lapghan: 36″ x 48″
  • Twin Bed Afghan: 60″ x 85″
  • Queen Bed Afghan: 90″ x 95″

 

19 Comments

  • Bethany, it looks great! I would like to make a scarf with this pattern.
    Thanks a lot!

  • Thanks Bethany for doing this very much appreciated

  • I love this stitch. I have to wait until after I go to the craft fair in October but I can’t wait to see all the stitches and make some of these squares. Thank you!! :)

  • Congratulations on your new column Bethany.
    Look forward to seeing more Stitchology

  • Thank you. I love this pattern.

  • This is wonderful…. can’t wait to see more!!!

  • Bethany, Congratulations to you and I guess to all of us who follow you.
    This is exciting! I love this stitch and look forward to learning more
    techniques and stitches. Hurray!

  • Always glad to see Bethany’s patterns. You’ll make a great addition to the blog! (c;

  • Congratulations, again, Bethany! This is a wonderful article and lesson. Thank you! Although I have done this before you have made it much easier for me to break down the chart and pattern.I really have to work to get back to my looming. I also think I am going to have to start another notebook for your columns!! Well done!! Looking forward to your future articles!!

  • Great article, Bethany! And the Herringbone sampler looks fabulous! I’m looking forward to seeing the next stitch pattern.

  • If I wanted to do a hat on a round loom, would I have to change any of the instructions? I’m new at this.

  • Hi Deena :)

    In order to make a hat using these instructions, you would first of all be working in the round in a clockwise direction. This would change the way you would read the chart to every row starting from the right to the left, rather than alternating directions.

    Also, you would need to use only the 10 peg repeating stitch pattern chart, rather than the square pattern chart, because you wouldn’t need the borders of garter stitch.

    Because the stitch pattern uses 10 pegs, your hat would need to be knit using a total number of pegs divisible by 10…ei: 30, 50, 70, etc.

    Hope this helps! I’d love to see a photo of your hat when you’re all done! :)

  • Thanks for the instructions, Bethany! That helps tremendously!

  • Can I use the cable cast on method or will this make it more difficult to stitch my finished panels together?
    Thank you for the expert explanation of charts and including both charts and written directions. I am looking forward to looming along/ learning along with you thru all the panels. I am starting this weekend, as soon as my daughter returns my loom! Hum.. maybe I’ll get her one for Christmas. Thanks for taking the time.

  • Hi Cindy! :)

    The Cable Cast On is a bit loose and lacy, and also might be a tad different than your bind off, which will always create a bit of a difficulty when attempting to create true squares. If you are using the mattress stitch to seam the squares together, it might not matter, except that you would end up with looser stitches on the back sides of the seams. ;) Having said all that, my favorite cast on, and on the one that most matches the Basic BO is the Chain CO, sometimes referred to as the Crochet CO.

    I am so happy you’ll be looming along with us! :D

  • I haven’t loomed much and never from a chart. Do I slip the first stitch of every row after cast on? If yes, and the chart has that first stitch noted as a knit stitch, does the slip stitch count as a knit? Would the start of row 8 be slip, knit, knit, purl, purl? Sorry but I won’t learn if I don’t ask. Thanks

  • Don’t be sorry! It’s a good question. :)

    Nope…no slip stitches at all. Just do what each square on the chart tells you to do. When you’re making an item to be seamed together with other items, it’s usually better to not slip the first stitch of every row. ;)

  • Thank you for helping me with my slip stitch question Bethany. I am 7 rows from completion of my square. My gauge is a little less but I figured as long as all my squares are the same number of stitches and rows it will work. I’ll just make more squares if necessary.

    My question is, can I use the bind off method that is done on the knitting board as opposed to the crochet hook bind off? If I remember correctly, Isela had a simple on the board bind off. I have done the one they teach on the KB tutorial site but mine always ends up to tight.

    Thanks for your help. I am looking forward to the next square.

  • Hi Cindy! You’re very welcome for the slip stitch tips. :)

    As for the bind off, I like to use the Basic Bind Off, which is I believe, the one that Isela demonstrates. I feel it matches best with the Chain Cast On and it creates a really nice edge, without any pulling on the panel.

    Yay for square making! I’m excited you’re looming along! As for gauge, some of the squares will use a different number of pegs and rows, due to the differences in the stitch style itself, but as long as you follow exactly, your squares should all match, even if they’re not 8″ X 8″. ;) I know the square for October uses fewer pegs and rows, as it’s a looser kind of stitch.

    Talk with you soon!
    Bethany~

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May 30, 2014

Summer Wrap/ Scarf

Lace_wrapcropThis summer fashion wrap can also be worn as a traditional scarf.  We use fun lightweight yarns and unique stitch variations.  Each design is simply a different yarn and stitch weave pattern.  You can make several of them to wear over sundresses, and t-shirts and shorts.

 Loom:  10” Knitting Board, with 22 stitches for double knit.  Set spacers at mid width or ¾” between boards.

 Yarn:  Any #2 or 3 yarn of acrylic or cotton/acrylic blend.  Our sample is knit with Bernat Baby Coordinates of acrylic/rayon/nylon, machine wash and dry.  (1) skein, 388 yds.  Color is Soft Grey.

 Notions Needed:  Loom, yarn, knit hook, crochet hook #4-4.5.

 Finished Size:  9” X 60” approximately

 Gauge:  Not noted

 Stitch Pattern:

 1-Open the pins-starting at first pin on top board, lift loop 1 onto pin 2.  Lift loop 3 onto pin 4.  Lift loop 5 onto pin 6 and continue across all 22 pins so that every other pin is empty. 

 2-Turn the board around, and open the pins for these 22 pins.  Be sure to start at this first pin also.  Both sides of loom have every other pin empty and off-set from the 2 sides.

 

summershawl

 

3-Work across all pins in stockinette weave, so that all pins are wrapped again. 

 

4-Hook over only the pins with the 3 loops lifting 2 loops over and leaving just one loop on the pins.  Do nothing to the pins with just one loop.

 

 

Instructions:

 Cast On all 22 stitches in basic stockinette stitch.  Lay anchor yarn of contrasting color yarn.

summershawl2Remember when hooking over the loops to work from L to R to approximate center.  Then work from R to L back to center.  Do same thing to other side of board.  This will keep the side edges even.

 Work the Stitch Pattern, steps 1-4 until the scarf/wrap is as long as desired, or until you have used the entire ball of yarn.  Using the entire ball will result in length of 60-64” long piece.  Cut yarn with 3-4” tail.

 Bind Off of knitting board: Use crochet hook for bind off starting at end opposite the yarn tail.  Pick up loops 1 & 2 from top board and pull loop closest to hook thru the other.  With just one loop on crochet hook, pick up the first loop from front board.  Pull loop closest to hook thru the other.  Pick up next loop from front board and pull one thru the other.  Continue working the 2 loops from back board, and 2 loops from front board until just one loop remains on crochet hook.  Pull the yarn tail thru the last loop to form a knot.  With crochet hook, pull the yarn tail into the solid edge of the knit.

 

Bind Off at anchor yarn: Start at end opposite the yarn tail.  With crochet hook, pick up first 2 loops.  Pull loop closest to hook thru the other.  Pick up next loop and repeat across the stitches on the anchor yarn.  When only one loop remains on hook, pull yarn tail thru loop to form knot.  Tuck yarn tail into knit with hook.

Finishing:  Gently stretch the knit from long sides to open the knit.  Work down the piece, gently stretching the stitches open.  Your great summer accessory is ready to wear.  You may also want to add a decorative stick pin to secure the wrap, so it stays closed while sitting in your favorite restaurant.

 Fun variations:

This fishnet pattern makes a nice open, scrunchy scarf or wrap to wear any time of year.

summershawl4

 

Yarn:  Loops and Threads Elegance, 100% acrylic, easy wash and air dry in 30 minutes.  (1) skein needed of 160 yds.  Color used is Poppy.

Stitch Pattern:

1-Open the pins-starting at first pin on top board, lift loop 1 onto pin no. two.Lift loop 3 onto pin 4.  Lift loop 5 onto pin 6 and continue across all 22 pins so that every other pin is empty. 

 

2-Do not turn the board around to work on front board.  Lift the 2nd loop and place onto 3rd pin.  Lift 4th loop and place onto 5th pin.  Continue across the 22 pins so that every other pin is empty.

 

summershawl53-Work across all pins in stockinette weave, so that all pins are wrapped again. 

 4-Hook over the pins with the 3 loops lifting 2 loops over and leaving just one loop on the pins.  If your pin has 2 loops, lift bottom over top.  Do nothing to the pins with just one loop.

 

Repeat steps 1-4 till wrap is as long as desired.

White with Silver Threads wrap is perfect with summer sun dresses as a shoulder wrap. 

summershawl7

summershawl6

It also makes a great accessory worn with your red holiday sweaters later in the year.  You will get so much wear from this piece.  It knits up really quickly and is easy care.

 

Yarn:Patons Glam Stripes, 85% acrylic and 15% polyester, machine wash and air dry. (1) skein of 261 yds will do the piece nicely.  Color used is White Silver.  The metallic threads will give a slight stripe effect.  Very pretty. Finished size is approximately 8” X 68”.  No gauge noted.

Stitch Pattern:

1-This piece is worked entirely with the Open Braid stitch.  After cast on of the 22 stitches, lay anchor yarn.  Weave from top first pin to bottom 4th pin.  Continue across the loom weaving every other pin till you get to end.  Carry yarn straight across to back and weave back, wrapping all the pins that were skipped.

2-Hook over all pins on both sides of loom, bottom loop over top loop. Continue steps 1 and 2 until you have used the entire skein of yarn.  Bind off.

Summer wraps and scarves also make a great accent when worn around your hips over long cotton skirts.  Just have lots of fun with them.

 

2 Comments

  • I am trying to buy the 5 peg sliders but can’t find them in a store and I didn’t want to pay $12 to ship a $5 item. Please let me know if anyone can assist me with this. Thanks

  • Hi, I think you live in Australia, correct? The shipping is crazy when items are going to countries outside of US. The only thing you can do is locate others in your area that may want something also and combine your orders for shipping. The item you seek is currently not sold to stores. Another thing you can do is ask your favorite knit or craft store to consider being a distributor and carry a few products. We could send your item with theirs. You can also send your address to us at info@knittingboard.com and ask for a first class rate on mailing and we can do a search for you and see if a better rate exists.

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Mar 7, 2013

Crown Stitch

I love playing around with my knitting looms. I have had my eye on this specific stitch for awhile but I just couldn’t wrap my mind around it. I knew it was totally possible but didn’t know how to go about it. I sat down and after a Crown Sttich few failed attempts and much fighting with my knitting loom, I came out victorious! The knitting loom doesn’t know yet that I have a “no quit” policy, hahaha!

I present to you, the Crown Stitch. A lot of my friends are calling it the “broom stitch” from crochet. Since you already know that I know nothing about crochet, I’ll take your word for it ;).

Ready? Here is a playlist on how to do the Crown Stitch. It is two videos. The most important part is at the end of Video 1 and the entire Video 2.

Written Instructions

Crown stitch

(Multiple of 5 stitches)

Row 1: k
Row 2: p
Row 3: k
Row 4: p
Row 5: k1, *k1, ewrap peg 3 times; rep from * to the peg before last, k1
Row 6: *Work on 5 pegs at a time, drop the loops on the first 5 pegs ( peg 1 and last peg only have 1 loop on it). Elongate these wraps. Move all the wraps to peg 1, then from peg 1 to peg 2. Elongate the wraps over 4 pegs (from peg 2 to peg 5). You will now work and create 5 stitches on these elongated wraps as follows: k1, [p1, k1]twice; rep from * to the end.
Row 7: knit
Row 8: purl.

Rep these 8 rows.

Enjoy!!!

2 Comments

  • I like your knitting loom patterns and stitches, videos it makes it a fun experience
    to use the knitting looms.

  • Wonderingbifvanyone could explain the brioch stitch on a board. Please.

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Jun 19, 2012

Mini-Series on Increases:

In the next couple of weeks, we are going to learn some new increases and how to create them on our knitting looms. We will be tackling the following: YO, M1, M1L, M1R, LLI, RLI, K1F&B, P1F&B, KRB.

Inc: Increase–what is it? It is a way to add stitches to your knitting either on a row or in the round. While adding stitches on a row in simple, adding stitches in the round is a little bit more tricky for us loom knitters are most of our looms have a set peg number and we cannot “add” pegs to our loom. However, with our AllnOne loom, we can add in the round! Yay for us!

Swing by later this week and we will go over a YO and how to create it on our loom.

 

4 Comments

  • Can’t wait to see it!

  • So looking forward to this–I try to ignore patterns that make be do anything other than the basics so will enjoy learning more about increasing.

  • It’s great you are sharing and increasing our knowledge base. Just a suggestion, it would be most helpful if the mini series were compiled in one place for easy and permanent reference.
    Thank you for making me a better loomer.

  • I will try to put a link on the side bar to this knowledge base. Thank you for the feedback.

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